WVSHP Logo Contact Information
News & Events

News from WVSHP

2019 Spring Meeting - Save the date SAVE THE DATE for the Spring Meeting 2019 April 26th and 27th, 2019 Embassy Suites, Charleston, WV (Click for more...)

News from elsewhere...
Up to 80% of Medicaid patients may be using insulin glargine past recommended discard date 4/20/2018 12:34:45 PM Up to 80% of Medicaid patients may be using insulin glargine past recommended discard date Fri, 04/20/2018 - 12:38 ehaberkorn@aph… Fri, 04/20/2018 - 12:34 Many Medicaid patients who use insulin glargine multiple-dose vials may be using it beyond the 28-day limit on punctured bottles, possibly leading to questionable product stability and sterility, according to research published online in the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association. (Click for more...) Study shows post-operative medication can prolong and cause chronic pain 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM Study shows post-operative medication can prolong and cause chronic pain Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 Research out of the University of Colorado, Boulder suggests that postoperative opioid use actually makes pain last longer. The finding was observed in male rats that were subjected to exploratory abdominal surgery, then either weaned off or abruptly withdrawn from morphine relief in the following days. In other cases, animal subjects that received a saline solution were compared with those that received morphine. According to the investigators, rats administered morphine suffered postoperative pain for more than 3 weeks longer than controls. The longer they received the opioid, with or without gradual tapering, the longer the pain persisted. Although the researchers concede their findings may not apply to humans in exactly the same way, they say the results form the basis for additional study. This indicates that there is another dark side of opiates that many people don't suspect," explains senior author Linda Watkins, a professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. "It shows that trauma, including surgery, in combination with opiates can lead to chronic pain." She and the study's co-author are calling for more study into the association between opioids and chronic pain. They are not alone in their work, with a few earlier small-scale projects involving humans showing a correlation between postoperative opioids and chronic pain as long as 1 year afterwards. (Click for more...) Association between baseline LDL-C level and total and cardiovascular mortality after LDL-C lowering 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM Association between baseline LDL-C level and total and cardiovascular mortality after LDL-C lowering Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 A meta-analysis tackled the question of whether baseline LDL-C level influences the extent to which mortality-based outcomes are achieved following LDL-C lowering therapy. Researchers considered 34 studies with more than 270,000 participants, 136,299 of whom received more intensive pharmacological intervention for high cholesterol and 133,989 of whom received less intensive intervention, such as randomization to a placebo or control group. More intensive exposure was associated with a deeper reduction in risk of both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: the primary co-outcomes. This correlation was absent, however, among patients whose baseline LDL-C level was below 100 mg/dL. The findings suggest that the greatest benefit from LDL-C–lowering therapy may occur among patients with baseline LDL-C levels at or above that threshold. (Click for more...) Pharmacist-prescribed contraception still hard to find 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM Pharmacist-prescribed contraception still hard to find Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 According to study findings, a new state law allowing pharmacists in California to directly prescribe hormonal contraceptives has not had much impact on practice. The statute, effective as of April 2016, aims to widen access to contraception—especially for women with financial and/or geographic limitations. However, report Priya Batra, MD, and colleagues at the University of California, Riverside, only a fraction of pharmacies contacted by telephone 6 months to 1 year after implementation were actually taking advantage of the opportunity. The researchers employed a "secret shopper" approach, with a caller posing as an insured teenage girl seeking information on pharmacist-prescribed contraception. Of 480 pharmacies, only 376 had a pharmacist or other staff member available to discuss the issue and only 22 confirmed that they could actually provide pharmacist-prescribed contraception. Moreover, just 5 said they could offer all four hormonal methods of contraception allowed under the state law: oral contraception, patch, vaginal ring, or depot injection. Writing in Obstetrics & Gynecology, the investigators note that the new law does not oblige insurers to reimburse pharmacists who provide the new service, perhaps removing an economic incentive for offering it. As a result, they conclude, pharmacy-prescribed contraception will need to be paired with mandated insurance coverage, pharmacist certification and credentialing, and other legal maneuvers to create a broader strategy. (Click for more...) CVS Health teams up with Job Corps to enhance workforce development opportunities for aspiring pharmacy technicians 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM CVS Health teams up with Job Corps to enhance workforce development opportunities for aspiring pharmacy technicians Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 CVS Health is working with Job Corps in an effort to expand work-based learning and externship opportunities for individuals studying to become pharmacy technicians. Participating Job Corps campuses include those in Long Beach, CA; Monroe, VA; St. Petersburg, FL; and Tulsa, OK. A pilot program is also launching this summer at the Pittsburgh campus. The new partnership will enable Job Corps to place students at local CVS pharmacies to learn directly from pharmacists and operations leaders. Students who successfully complete the training will be eligible to apply for a job at CVS Pharmacy. Job Corps students who are roughly 75% through with their career training are required to complete work-based learning or an externship with a local employer to gain work experience. The expanded relationship with Job Corps is part of the myCVS Journey Pathways to Health Care Careers that introduces students of all ages to career opportunities in health care. (Click for more...) More than 25,000 prescription drugs missing from LA state database 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM More than 25,000 prescription drugs missing from LA state database Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 The Louisiana Legislative Auditor conducted an https://www.lla.la.gov/PublicReports.nsf/BEF55FA81E8CD40F8625826C007083…; target="_blank">audit of the state prescription monitoring program (PMP) following an increase in overdose deaths and an increase in the dispensing of addictive medications in the state. By law, the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy must maintain a PMP that monitors controlled substances and drugs of concern dispensed in the state. The audit more than 25,500 prescriptions dispensed during 2016 with outstanding errors that were not corrected and not entered into the PMP database as of November 2017. Auditors also found more than 14,000 missing hydrocodone and oxycodone prescriptions in a 1-year period between workers' compensation and Medicaid prescriptions. (Click for more...) U.S. senators put pressure on Juul, FDA to tighten marketing regulations 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM U.S. senators put pressure on Juul, FDA to tighten marketing regulations Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 Nearly a dozen Democratic U.S. senators are calling on the top-selling e-cigarette maker and FDA to tighten the marketing of the devices. The senators are urging FDA "to take immediate steps to ban kid-friendly candy and fruit flavorings that are used with e-cigarettes and cigars." During testimony before Congress this week, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, indicated the agency is considering addressing soon how Juul is marketed. Juul is sold in the form of a pen or USB flash drive that is easy to use and hide. In a separate letter the Kevin Burns, CEO of Juul Labs Inc., the senators questioned how the product is marketed to children and teens and asked what ingredients are in the flavorings that accompany these products. The senators asked Juul to take self-imposed steps to limit youth use of their product. "Your company's popular vaping device and its accompanying flavored nicotine cartridges are undermining our nation's efforts to reduce tobacco use among youth and putting an entire new generation of children at risk of nicotine addiction and other health consequences," the senators said in their letter to Burns. In a statement, Burns said the company "takes this matter very seriously," and he said they are finalizing a plan for new actions and initiatives that will be introduced soon. (Click for more...) NIH abruptly changes course on industry opioids partnership after ethics flags raised 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM NIH abruptly changes course on industry opioids partnership after ethics flags raised Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 In an abrupt shift, NIH announced late last week that it will not accept funds from drug makers as part of a planned opioids research partnership worth roughly $400 million. Citing recommendations issued earlier this month by an advisory panel, NIH Director Francis Collins said the agency will exclusively use taxpayer money to fund a comprehensive research initiative on pain and substance use disorder treatment. "I fully embrace [the] recommendation that NIH should vigorously address the national opioid crisis with government funds and decline cash contributions through partnerships from the private sector," Collins said in a statement. Instead of accepting cash from drug companies interested in teaming up, Collins said the NIH would lean on industry only for help in setting up a clinical trial network, establishing common biomarkers for drug development, and sharing data. The move was a major shift for Collins, who has publicly expressed excitement about the partnership, specifically pointing to the prospect of drug companies chipping in funds to leverage agency dollars. NIH has reportedly become wary of the perception that the private sector wields too much influence over the direction of taxpayer-funded research. (Click for more...) DEA to share prescription drug data with 50 attorneys general, crack down on drugmakers 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM DEA to share prescription drug data with 50 attorneys general, crack down on drugmakers Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 DEA has reached an agreement with 50 attorneys general to share prescription drug data with one another to support ongoing investigations. The agency will provide attorneys general in 48 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico with data from its Automation of Reports and Consolidated Orders System, which collects 80 million prescription drug transactions from manufacturers and distributors each year. In return, states will provide the federal agency with their own data from prescription drug monitoring programs. Delaware and Arkansas are the only two states not participating in the data-sharing agreement. The agreement comes months after President Trump's opioid commission announced its support for the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Act, which would provide funding for a DOJ-led data sharing hub. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the data-sharing pact will "make both DEA and our state partners more effective at finding evidence of crime." Enforcement has been a focal point in the Trump administration's approach to the opioid crisis. Last year, the Department of Justice created the Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit to focus on using data to track down individuals illegally distributing opioids. (Click for more...) Cigna-Express Scripts deal to face Justice Department review 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM Cigna-Express Scripts deal to face Justice Department review Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 The U.S. Department of Justice plans to review Cigna's planned purchase of Express Scripts Holding, Cigna said Wednesday. The health insurer agreed in March to acquire Express Scripts, a PBM, for $54 billion. The company hopes the combination can lower costs and improve benefits for Americans by simplifying the health care supply chain. In a statement, Cigna said it is "optimistic in our ability to obtain regulatory approval." (Click for more...) Bernie Sanders introduces bill to impose jail time for execs behind opioid crisis 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM Bernie Sanders introduces bill to impose jail time for execs behind opioid crisis Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) is proposing a bill to impose jail time for pharmaceutical executives whose companies engage in manipulative practices when marketing opioids. If an executive's company is found to have illegally contributed to the opioid crisis, he or she would face a 10-year minimum prison sentence and fines equal to an executive's compensation package. The measure would also impose an additional fine of $7.8 billion on those companies, reflecting one-tenth the annual cost of the crisis, per a 2016 estimate. The bill contains potential mechanisms by which HHS could demonstrate liability, such as mandating written justifications for opioid orders that seem medically unreasonable. Meanwhile, an opioid reimbursement fund, to be administered by HHS, would collect fines levied under the new law and distribute them to other federal departments. The bill would also prevent companies from directly marketing opioid products without adequate warning of their addictive properties. (Click for more...) After signs that cancer patients could take less of an expensive drug, its maker tripled the price 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM After signs that cancer patients could take less of an expensive drug, its maker tripled the price Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 A group of cancer doctors focused on bringing down the cost of treatments by testing whether lower doses are effective thought they had found a prime candidate in the blood cancer drug ibrutinib (Imbruvica—Pharmacyclics) that typically costs $148,000 a year. The science behind the drug suggested that it could work at lower doses, and early clinical evidence indicated that patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia might do just as well on one or two tablets a day after completing an initial round of treatment at three tablets per day. The researchers at the Value in Cancer Care Consortium set out to test whether the lower dose was just as effective. Then they learned of a new pricing strategy by Janssen and Pharmacyclics, the companies that sell the drug through a partnership. Within the next 3 months, the companies will stop making the original 140-milligram capsule. They will instead offer tablets in four strengths—each of which has the same flat price of about $400, or triple the original cost of the drug. Janssen and Pharmacyclics said the companies began to develop the new single-tablet dosing regimen in 2015 "as a new innovation to provide patients with a convenient one tablet, once-a-day dosing regimen and improved packaging, with the intent to improve adherence to this important therapy." They called the studies on lower dosing "highly exploratory in nature." (Click for more...) Gene therapy in patients with transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia 4/20/2018 4:05:01 AM Gene therapy in patients with transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia Wed, 04/18/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Fri, 04/20/2018 - 04:05 Interim results of a new study show that gene therapy reduced or eliminated the need for long-term red-cell transfusions in nearly two dozen patients with severe beta-thalassemia without serious adverse events related to the drug product. The study involved two Phase I–II trials in which researchers obtained mobilized autologous CD34+ cells from 22 patients with transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia and transduced the cells ex vivo with LentiGlobin BB305 vector, which encodes adult hemoglobin (HbA) with a T87Q amino acid substitution (HbAT87Q). The cells were reinfused after the patients had undergone myeloablative busulfan conditioning. At a median of 26 months after infusion of the gene-modified cells, 12 of the 13 patients who had a non–beta0/beta0 genotype had stopped receiving red-cell transfusions. In 9 patients with a beta0/beta0 genotype or two copies of the IVS1-110 mutation, the median annualized transfusion volume was reduced by nearly 75%, and red-cell transfusions were stopped in 3 patients. No serious adverse events related to the drug product were detected, and there were no significant unexpected safety issues, the researchers found. They report "that gene therapy with LentiGlobin drug product succeeded in overcoming a principal limitation of allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation, which is a lack of a histocompatible donor. The safety profile after infusion was consistent with that associated with myeloablative conditioning with single-agent busulfan." (Click for more...) What patients don’t know about NSAIDs may lead to misuse 4/19/2018 9:29:04 AM What patients don’t know about NSAIDs may lead to misuse Thu, 04/19/2018 - 09:34 ehaberkorn@aph… Thu, 04/19/2018 - 09:29 With a multitude of nonprescription as well as prescription NSAID products, it has been difficult to document how patients actually take NSAIDs. (Click for more...) Sessions tries to put new pressure on drug companies in opioid crisis 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM Sessions tries to put new pressure on drug companies in opioid crisis Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Tuesday proposed new regulations that could severely limit the amount of opioids that drug companies can produce and force them to account for scores of illegitimate prescriptions across the country. The regulations would change how DEA sets production quotas for drug manufacturers. Those companies would have to work with states, CDC, and other federal and state agencies to justify the number of drugs they send to medical providers. "Under this proposed new rule, if DEA believes that a company's opioids are being diverted for misuse, then they will reduce the amount of opioids that company can make," Sessions said. While the change allows DEA to more actively track where pharmaceutical companies send their products, a 2016 law hamstrings the ability of the agency to stop shipments. The announcement was spurred by a lawsuit filed by the attorney general of West Virginia, Patrick Morrisey, who accused DEA of allowing companies to create their own quotas for drug manufacturing, without justifying where those drugs were going. Sessions's proposed change must still go through the federal rule-making process before going into effect. It will be published in the Federal Register and opened to public comment in the coming days. (Click for more...) FDA approves first therapy for rare inherited form of rickets, x-linked hypophosphatemia 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM FDA approves first therapy for rare inherited form of rickets, x-linked hypophosphatemia Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 FDA approved on Tuesday burosumab (Crysvita—Ultragenyx Pharmaceutical) for the treatment of adults and children aged 1 year and older with x-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). The rare, inherited form of rickets causes low levels of phosphorus in the blood and leads to impaired bone growth and development in children and adolescents as well as problems with bone mineralization throughout a patient's life. "XLH differs from other forms of rickets in that vitamin D therapy is not effective," said Julie Beitz, MD., director of the Office of Drug Evaluation III in FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. "This is the first FDA-approved medication for the treatment of XLH and a real breakthrough for those living with this serious disease." XLH affects about 3,000 children and 12,000 adults nationwide. The safety and efficacy of burosumab were studied in four clinical trials. The placebo-controlled trial found that 94% of adults taking burosumab once a month achieved normal phosphorus levels, compared with 8% of those taking a placebo. For children, 94%–100% of patients treated with burosumab every 2 weeks achieved normal phosphorus levels. The most common adverse events in adults taking burosumab were back pain, headache, restless leg syndrome, decreased vitamin D, dizziness, and constipation. The most common adverse effects for children were headache, injection site reaction, vomiting, decreased vitamin D, and pyrexia. Burosumab received Breakthrough Therapy designation as well as Orphan Drug designation. (Click for more...) Mortality associated with use of SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, and DPP-4 inhibitors for type 2 diabetes 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM Mortality associated with use of SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, and DPP-4 inhibitors for type 2 diabetes Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 A network meta-analysis sought to determine how SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, and DPP-4 inhibitors compare in reducing mortality and cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. The British study included 236 trials and more than 176,000 participants. According to the data, the use of SGLT-2 inhibitors or GLP-1 agonists was associated with reductions in all-cause and cardiovascular mortality compared with DPP-4 inhibitors and the control groups. In addition, the SGLT-2 inhibitors were associated with further cardiovascular benefits for heart failure events compared with incretin-based therapies and control groups as well as for myocardial infarction events compared with control groups. The authors note, "Of the 3 classes tested, SGLT-2 inhibition may be preferred over the incretin-based therapies based on their association with lower mortality and their favorable adverse event profile." The researchers also report that the use of DPP-4 inhibitors was not associated with reduced mortality compared with placebo or no treatment. (Click for more...) Nivolumab plus ipilimumab in lung cancer with a high tumor mutational burden 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM Nivolumab plus ipilimumab in lung cancer with a high tumor mutational burden Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 With tumor mutational burden demonstrating potential as a biomarker for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the combination of nivolumab/ipilimumab looking good as a treatment option, researchers put both of these developments together in a Phase III trial. The study population included patients with stage IV or recurrent NSCLC not previously treated with chemotherapy, stratified according to whether tumor programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression was at least 1% or if it was below that threshold. Participants with high tumor mutational burden were equally randomized to one of three treatment arms: nivolumab alone, nivolumab plus ipilimumab, or chemotherapy. Patients with a low tumor mutational burden, meanwhile, were evenly randomized to nivolumab plus ipilimumab, nivolumab with chemotherapy, or chemotherapy only. Among patients with high mutational burden, as determined by the FoundationOne CDx assay, progression-free survival was significantly prolonged with the combination treatment vs. chemotherapy. At 1 year, the outcome was documented in 42.6% of the nivolumab plus ipilimumab patients compared with 13.2% of the chemotherapy patients. The benefit of nivolumab plus ipilimumab over chemotherapy was seen across subgroups, including patients with a PD-L1 expression level of at least 1% and those with a lower level. The results uphold the benefit of nivolumab plus ipilimumab in NSCLC and the utility of tumor mutational burden as a biomarker for patient selection. (Click for more...) CVS Health expands West Virginia opioid disposal 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM CVS Health expands West Virginia opioid disposal Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 CVS Health announced it is installing safe medical disposal kiosks in 19 CVS Pharmacy locations throughout West Virginia. In addition, the CVS Health Foundation will make a $20,000 grant to Westbrook Health Services in Parkersburg, WV, to support opioid addiction recovery. CVS Health vice president of professional services Thomas Davis said: "We are expanding our safe medication disposal efforts to provide more locations where people can safely dispose of unwanted medications, getting them out of medicine cabinets where they could be abused. Our safe medication disposal initiative, and our funding for community organizations supporting addiction recovery in West Virginia, are an extension of CVS Health's purpose of helping people on their path to better health." Westbrook Health Services provides behavioral health services in eight West Virginia counties. The grant, CVS said, will support the organization's Community Partner Outreach Initiative for Health. (Click for more...) Aetna to reorganize ahead of CVS deal 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM Aetna to reorganize ahead of CVS deal Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 Ahead of its planned $69 billion acquisition by CVS Health, Aetna said Tuesday it will reorganize its business units. The insurer said it would divide its business into a health care segment and a "corporate/other" category that will include discontinued products, divested contracts, and corporate expenses that do not support the company's business operations. CVS Health announced plans to acquire Aetna last December. (Click for more...) First medical marijuana pharmacy in New Orleans area gets permit approved 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM First medical marijuana pharmacy in New Orleans area gets permit approved Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 New Orleans pharmacist Ruston Henry of H&W Drug Store Inc. has been selected to operate one of the first medical marijuana pharmacies in New Orleans, the state Pharmacy Board reported. The decision followed testimony from five applicants vying for the Region 1 permit. A seven-member subcommittee of the board ranked the companies, while the rest of the board became an advisory panel in charge of awarding the operating permit. In arguing for his pharmacy to win the bid, Henry told the board his location was the best site because it was near other retail outlets, close to the interstate, and would share a parking lot with a nearby substation of the New Orleans Police Department. He described himself as a second-generation pharmacist who took over the business his father launched more than half a century ago. (Click for more...) Association of a smartphone application with medication adherence and blood pressure control 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM Association of a smartphone application with medication adherence and blood pressure control Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 To determine if a smartphone application could help patients exert better control of their blood pressure, researchers recruited more than 400 adults for a randomized study. Participants in the MedISAFE-BP trial had confirmed uncontrolled hypertension, for which they were prescribed anywhere from 1–3 treatments. A total of 209 patients were randomly assigned to download and use the app—which included reminder alerts, medication adherence reports, and optional peer support—while 202 served as controls. At 12-week followup, self-reported adherence to antihypertensive drugs improved slightly in the intervention group and not at all in the control group. Mean systolic blood pressure, declined, respectively, by 10.6 mm Hg and 10.1 mm Hg, for an insignificant between-group difference of -0.5. Although there was no difference in blood pressure between the two sets of patients, those who used the smart app did register a small improvement in adherence, which is implicated in as many as 50% of all cases of uncontrolled hypertension. (Click for more...) Legislation aims to safely dispose of unwanted drugs 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM Legislation aims to safely dispose of unwanted drugs Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 A bipartisan group of U.S. senators has introduced the Safe Disposal of Unused Medication Act of 2018, a bill allowing for the safe disposal of unwanted drugs when patients are receiving hospice care at home. Under current federal regulations, hospice staff are not allowed to dispose of unused medicines, even after the patient has died. The legislation would permit hospice staff (physicians and registered nurses) or emergency medical services professionals to dispose of controlled substances when a patient dies or a treatment expires. Qualified hospice programs must have a written policy and procedure for drug disposal in place to be distributed to a patient’s family. Additionally, hospice employees must hold a conversation with a patient's family member or representative about medicine disposal policies when a controlled substance is first ordered. (Click for more...) U.S. regulators float ideas for boosting medical device safety 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM U.S. regulators float ideas for boosting medical device safety Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 A new FDA plan lists concepts and proposals for improving federal medical device oversight, targeting better safeguards on pacemakers, artificial joints, medical scanners, and other products. The agency will consider requiring more training for physicians who implant high-risk devices, which may demand new guidelines or regulations. FDA also will consider additional scrutiny of devices for women; new ways to encourage manufacturers to enhance safety, including faster approval for devices that appear safer than what is available; and mandating cybersecurity features for electronic devices such as implantable heart pacemakers and defibrillators. In addition, the agency will request more funding for a public-private system designed to track insurance claims, electronic health records, and other data sources for early signs of device problems. The project is calculated to cost $250 million over 5 years to become operational, and is currently slated to receive $30 million from device manufacturers. (Click for more...) West Virginia reaches $550k settlement in opioid case 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM West Virginia reaches $550k settlement in opioid case Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 The West Virginia Attorney General's office has reached a $550,000 settlement with a pharmacy it accused of distributing about 10 million doses of opioids to a county with less than 25,000 people. The office had argued that, for over a decade, Larry's Drive-in Pharmacy failed to identify suspicious prescriptions or evaluate if it was dispensing a questionable amount of opioids. The pharmacy, which is now closed, denies all wrongdoing and liability and claims that its actions were legal and in accordance with all regulations. "Every aspect of the pharmaceutical supply chain bears responsibility the senseless death brought upon our state," said state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey. "This settlement demonstrates my commitment to go after all parties, regardless of size, to ensure their conduct adhere to best practices so that our state can reach her full potential." (Click for more...) Canadian pharmacy fined $34 million for illegal imports 4/19/2018 3:05:01 AM Canadian pharmacy fined $34 million for illegal imports Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Thu, 04/19/2018 - 03:05 A judge in Montana approved on Friday $34 million in fines for an online pharmacy that imported counterfeit cancer therapies and other unapproved pharmaceuticals into the United States. While Canada Drugs promoted itself as a safe alternative for patients to save money on costly treatments, U.S. prosecutors said the company's business model is completely based on illegally importing unapproved and misbranded products from Canada and elsewhere around the world. Prosecutors said the company has made at least $78 million through illegal imports, including a fake version of the cancer drugs bevacizumab (Avastin—Genentech). On April 13, U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen approved federal prosecutors' recommended sentences that included $29 million forfeited, $5 million in fines, and 5 years' probation for Canada Drugs. In addition, company founded Kris Thorkelson was sentenced to 6 months' house arrest, 5 years' probation, and a $250,000 fine. The deal also calls for Canada Drugs to permanently halt the sale of all unapproved, misbranded, and counterfeit drugs and surrender all of the domain names for the many websites it used to sell the products. The Partnership for Safe Medicines, an advocacy group, had urged the judge to impose harsher penalties to deter future crimes. (Click for more...) WVU Benefits Open Enrollment continues through May 15; HSC session set for April 25 4/19/2018 12:00:00 AM WVU Benefits Administration is hosting a Benefits Information Table at the Health Sciences Center in HR, G211-B on Wednesday, April 25 from 1 to 3 p.m. (Click for more...) Safety violations compound pain of opioid analgesic shortages 4/18/2018 2:37:50 AM Safety violations compound pain of opioid analgesic shortages Mon, 04/16/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Wed, 04/18/2018 - 02:37 Safety violations at a major compounding pharmacy are exacerbating hospital shortages of opioid analgesics, particularly in California where health officials have prohibited sales from one of its plants. In late March, California's Board of Pharmacy barred the distribution of medications from a Texas factory belonging to the company, PharMEDium. The decision came after the pharmacy board had issued a cease-and-desist order against the plant in February, citing "an immediate threat to the public health or safety." In December, FDA issued an inspection report on PharMEDium's Tennessee plant that led the company to voluntarily cease production there. PharMEDium, one of the nation's largest compounding pharmacy companies, is owned by AmerisourceBergen and supplies medications to approximately 77% of hospitals nationwide. The shortage of analgesics has forced doctors to turn to second-choice pain drugs and increased their use of local anesthetics such as lidocaine. But now, even those local anesthetics—lidocaine, ropivacaine, and bupivacaine—are in short supply due to manufacturing problems and back orders, according to doctors and federal regulators. Shortages have hit California health care providers especially hard. They must contend with the state crackdown on PharMEDium's Texas plant, which produces local anesthetics, and federal scrutiny of the Tennessee plant, which produces the injectable opioids. (Click for more...) What you need to know about statutes of limitations 4/17/2018 9:26:53 PM What you need to know about statutes of limitations Tue, 04/17/2018 - 13:59 tenglish@aphanet.org Tue, 04/17/2018 - 21:26 Do you remember the details of interactions with every patient you had 2 months ago? What about 1 year ago? The reality is that health care providers cannot rely on memory to recall details that could make the difference in successfully defending themselves against a lawsuit or state licensing board complaint. (Click for more...) Navigating disability insurance needs as a New Practitioner 4/17/2018 9:16:44 PM Navigating disability insurance needs as a New Practitioner Tue, 04/17/2018 - 15:00 tenglish@aphanet.org Tue, 04/17/2018 - 21:16 When I talk with New Practitioners about building a solid financial foundation, insurance is a critical piece of the puzzle. Alongside other competing priorities such as student loan debt, it is easy to think, “Do I really need to spend my money here?” (Click for more...) Find your voice in the NPN 4/17/2018 8:54:39 PM Find your voice in the NPN Tue, 04/17/2018 - 12:00 tenglish@aphanet.org Tue, 04/17/2018 - 20:54 The end of my term as New Practitioner Advisory Committee (NPAC) chair in March was a bittersweet time. Approaching my fifth graduation anniversary, the New Practitioner Network (NPN) has truly become a “home,” where I’ve created lasting friendships and had valuable leadership experiences along the way. (Click for more...) Stress relief via a four-legged friend 4/17/2018 5:45:09 PM Stress relief via a four-legged friend Tue, 04/17/2018 - 22:59 tenglish@aphanet.org Tue, 04/17/2018 - 17:45 New Practitioners are often caught up in the day-to-day routine of residency, fellowship, and careers. Stress becomes a present reality and often you do not realize your workload is all-consuming. It is helpful to incorporate healthy distractions into your routines to remind you that there is more to life than work. (Click for more...) APhA2018 through the eyes of a New Practitioner 4/17/2018 5:31:19 PM APhA2018 through the eyes of a New Practitioner Tue, 04/17/2018 - 17:00 tenglish@aphanet.org Tue, 04/17/2018 - 17:31 The APhA Annual Meeting & Exposition is not just a meeting you attend, but rather one that provides you with a variety of different experiences. (Click for more...) Nonoptimized medication therapy costs U.S. $528.4 billion a year 4/16/2018 8:45:12 AM Nonoptimized medication therapy costs U.S. $528.4 billion a year Mon, 04/16/2018 - 08:49 ehaberkorn@aph… Mon, 04/16/2018 - 08:45 Nonoptimized medication therapy costs the United States $528.4 billion a year, roughly 16% of the nation’s total health expenditure, according to researchers in a study published online in the Annals of Pharmacotherapy on March 1. (Click for more...) Dr. Suresh Madhavan to receive AACP's prestigious Dawson Award for Excellence in Patient Care Research 4/16/2018 12:00:00 AM The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) will recognize S. Suresh Madhavan, M.B.A., Ph.D., FAPhA professor and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy at the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, for his innovative research addressing the profound health disparities in West Virginia. He will receive the Paul R. Dawson Award for Excellence in Patient Care Research on July 23 during the Science Plenary at Pharmacy Education 2018, the AACP Annual Meeting, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Click for more...) Pharmacists’ services and H.R. 592 noted at House opioid hearing 4/13/2018 3:35:46 PM Pharmacists’ services and H.R. 592 noted at House opioid hearing Fri, 04/13/2018 - 16:04 ehaberkorn@aph… Fri, 04/13/2018 - 15:35 Members of Congress, CMS, and health care leaders noted pharmacists’ services and H.R. (Click for more...) New evidence suggests patients may safely take triptans with SSRIs/SNRIs 4/13/2018 1:36:11 PM New evidence suggests patients may safely take triptans with SSRIs/SNRIs Fri, 04/13/2018 - 13:42 ehaberkorn@aph… Fri, 04/13/2018 - 13:36 Data published in JAMA Neurology in February questioned the basis of an established FDA advisory and might offer relief to those with comorbid headaches and depression. (Click for more...) The state of U.S. health: Burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors among U.S. states 4/11/2018 5:05:01 PM The state of U.S. health: Burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors among U.S. states Tue, 04/10/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Wed, 04/11/2018 - 17:05 A new study highlights the wide differences in the burden of disease at the state level. Researchers used the results of the Global Burden of Disease Study to identify trends in the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors from 1990 to 2016. In all, researchers examined 333 causes and 84 risk factors. During the study period, overall death rates in the United States dropped from 745.2 per 100,000 persons to 578.0 per 100,000 persons. At 81.3 years, Hawaii had the highest life expectancy at birth in 2016, while Mississippi had the lowest, at 74.7 years. Meanwhile, Minnesota had the highest health life expectancy at birth with 70.3 years and West Virginia had the lowest, with 63.8 years. In 2016, six risks individually accounted for more than 5% of risk-attributable disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs): tobacco consumption, high body mass index (BMI), poor diet, alcohol and drug use, high fasting plasma glucose, and high blood pressure. Opioid use disorders increased from the 11th leading cause of DALYs at the beginning of the study to the 7th leading cause in 2016. For all states, the leading risk factors in terms of attributable DALYs were due to one of three causes: tobacco consumption (32 states), high BMI (10 states), or alcohol and drug use (8 states). "Specific diseases and risk factors, such as drug use disorders, high BMI, poor diet, high fasting plasma glucose level, and alcohol use disorders are increasing and warrant increased attention," the researchers report, noting that the findings "can be used to inform national health priorities for research, clinical care, and policy." (Click for more...) Health officials: Prison program helps lower overdose deaths 4/11/2018 5:05:01 PM Health officials: Prison program helps lower overdose deaths Tue, 04/10/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Wed, 04/11/2018 - 17:05 The number of accidental drug overdose deaths in Rhode Island dropped to 323 last year from 336 in 2016, a decline partly attributable to an expanded treatment program for prisoners with opioid addiction, according to state health officials. After years of steady increases, the 4% dip in accidental overdose deaths represents a "small bit of momentum" that is energizing, said Health Department Director Nicole Alexander-Scott. The program demonstrates that these addictive medications can be smoothly introduced in a prison environment, said Andrew Klein, a senior criminal justice research analyst at Advocates for Human Potential, Inc. In 2016, the state began screening all prisoners for opioid addiction and offering the three federally approved medications for opioid addiction to prisoners who could benefit from the treatment; previously the state provided only methadone. About 8% of Rhode Island's prison population is participating in the program. When they are released from prison, individuals have the option of transferring to a community-based treatment program and are also given a supply of naloxone. A study recently published in the JAMA Psychiatry also found that the addiction treatment program was leading to a decline in post-incarceration overdose deaths. (Click for more...) Doctors bristle at push for opioid prescription limits 4/11/2018 5:05:01 PM Doctors bristle at push for opioid prescription limits Tue, 04/10/2018 - 20:00 cbaker_admin Wed, 04/11/2018 - 17:05 Limits on the amount of opioids that doctors can prescribe have sparked opposition from the American Medical Association (AMA). The group warns that the opioid rules are arbitrary and inhibit a doctor's ability to care for their patients on an individual basis. AMA "supports and encourages judicious prescribing of opioids," says Patrice Harris, MD, chairwoman of the association's opioid task force. But the AMA has "grave concerns" about limits on both dosage and supply. "Pain is a complex, biopsychosocial phenomenon, and individuals experience pain in different ways," Harris says. "AMA believes that decisions around dosages needs to be left between the patient and the physician." Stefan Kertesz, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Alabama Birmingham School of Medicine, says that "most people think, and I agree, that excess prescribing of opioids was at least one major contributor to today's tragedy. And so the instinct that we need to continue a course correction of a serious nature is well placed. The question is, when is that course correction best enforced as a matter of governmental mandates, and when is that course correction best advanced through a combination of state-based educational and regulatory initiatives that might fall short of hard and fast legislation." (Click for more...) Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy masters, PhD and MD/PhD investiture and commencement ceremony set 4/11/2018 12:00:00 AM Faculty are invited to celebrate the masters, PhD, and MD/PhD graduates in the Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy on Friday, May 11 at 9 a.m. in Okey Patteson Auditorium. (Click for more...) Colorado bill would reimburse certain pharmacists’ services 4/10/2018 10:47:01 AM Colorado bill would reimburse certain pharmacists’ services Tue, 04/10/2018 - 10:30 dyap@aphanet.org Tue, 04/10/2018 - 10:47 The Colorado legislature has approved state legislation that would require insurers to reimburse pharmacists for services delivered in an area with a health professional shortage, if the plans cover the same services when delivered by a physician or advanced practice nurse. (Click for more...) Ali Rezai appointed Rockefeller Chair in Neuroscience at WVU 4/9/2018 12:00:00 AM An investiture ceremony will be held on Monday at 4 p.m. in the Pylons Lobby of the WVU Health Sciences Center. (Click for more...) Alumna returns to campus as guest speaker for Louis A. Luzzi Lectureship Series 3/9/2018 12:00:00 AM Dr. Joanna Stollings, a 2003 graduate of the WVU School of Pharmacy, returned to campus March 9 as guest speaker for the Lois A. Luzzi Lectureship Series. (Click for more...) Science advocate, author to speak at WVU 3/7/2018 12:00:00 AM Paul A. Offit, M.D., a physician-scientist who is an expert in infectious diseases, immunology, virology and vaccine and the founding director of the Autism Science Foundation, will speak on "Scientific Misadventures: Learning from the Past," at noon, Friday, March 23 in the Patteson Auditorium at WVU's Health Sciences Center. (Click for more...) Health in West Virginia: The Next 150 Years 3/5/2018 12:00:00 AM West Virginia University President E. Gordon Gee will join Health Sciences Vice President and Executive Dean Clay Marsh, M.D., and WVU Medicine-WVU Hospitals President and CEO Albert L. Wright Jr., at a Health Sciences Town Hall on Wed., March 28 at noon in Okey Patteson Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public. (Click for more...) Schwinghammer retiring from WVU School of Pharmacy; Slain named new chair of clinical pharmacy 3/2/2018 12:00:00 AM Dr. Douglas Slain, an infectious disease specialist and professor at the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, will be appointed the new chairperson of the School's clinical pharmacy department. Slain succeeds Dr. Terry Schwinghammer, who will retire this spring. (Click for more...) APhA annual meeting alumni reception 2/23/2018 12:00:00 AM The WVU School of Pharmacy will host an alumni reception at the 2018 APhA annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee. (Click for more...) CDC to offer continuing education course on vaccine immunization in Morgantown 2/21/2018 12:00:00 AM The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is offering a continuing education course titled CDC Pink Book Training: Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine Preventable Diseases on April 10-11, 2018, at the Morgantown Marriott at Waterfront Place in Morgantown, West Virginia. (Click for more...) WVU researcher wins national award; examines use of multiple medications among older cancer survivors 2/20/2018 12:00:00 AM Traci LeMasters, assistant professor in the School of Pharmacy, is a recipient of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy's New Investigator Award, which grants funding to early-career faculty to jumpstart independent research programs. She is one of only 16 people nationwide to receive the award this year. (Click for more...) WVU School of Pharmacy professor debunks common flu-related myths 2/14/2018 12:00:00 AM The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) "FluView" map shows the virus is currently active in all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico. WVU School of Pharmacy professor Douglas Slain, specializing in infectious diseases, answers some frequently asked questions and dispels common myths. (Click for more...) WVU Festival of Ideas to host panel of six opioid crisis experts 2/12/2018 12:00:00 AM Six experts on the state's opioid crisis will take part in a panel discussion Feb. 20 in the Charleston Civic Center Little Theater as part of West Virginia University's Festival of Ideas. "Understanding the Opioid Epidemic" starts at 7:30 p.m., and is co-sponsored by The Charleston Gazette-Mail. (Click for more...) Lockman appointed assistant VP for Experimental Therapeutics 2/9/2018 12:00:00 AM Dr. Paul Lockman, Professor and Chair of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences in the School of Pharmacy, joined the Office of Research and Graduate Education as the Assistant Vice President for Experimental Therapeutics on January 1st in addition to his current roles. As a cross campus priority for collaboration, and an exciting area of focus at the HSC across diverse disciplines, Dr. Lockman brings the expertise and leadership to connect investigators and help develop new collaborations. (Click for more...) WVU groups to host body positivity event Feb. 19 2/9/2018 12:00:00 AM Groups and organizations across West Virginia University are collaborating to create a night of body acceptance for students. The WVU Collegiate Recovery Program, WELLWVU, Carruth Center, WVU Medicine Student Health and the WVU Women's Resource Center will host "Accepting EveryBODY" on February 19, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the WVU Recreation Center, Meeting Room A. (Click for more...) Nominations for Women in Science and Health Awards now open 2/8/2018 12:00:00 AM Sponsored by the Women in Science and Health (WISH) Committee, the Women in Science and Health Awards recognize outstanding achievements made by women working at West Virginia University Health Sciences. (Click for more...) Over-the-Counter Medication Donations Needed for Honduras 2/7/2018 12:00:00 AM Nurse Practitioner and DNP students from the WVU School of Nursing will provide primary care services in remote areas of Honduras in April. The team members pay their own way and bring all medications and supplies needed for the week. (Click for more...) WVU Rural Health Day 2018 2/1/2018 12:00:00 AM Registration is now open for the 3rd annual WVU Rural Health Day on Saturday, April 14, 2018 at the WVU Health Sciences Center in Morgantown. The purpose of WVU Rural Health Day is to give pre-health students interested in rural medicine the opportunity to hear about and participate in activities that will enhance, impassion, and provide support in the sometimes daunting path to applying to medical school. (Click for more...) SOP 'Dean's Hour' features lessons for success from 'The Wizard of Oz' 1/24/2018 12:00:00 AM Almost everyone has seen the 1939 movie "The Wizard of Oz," but what they may not realize is that it contains valuable lessons that are useful to all of us as we seek success in our personal and professional lives. (Click for more...) WVU School of Pharmacy announces Dean's List for fall 2017 term. 1/23/2018 12:00:00 AM Congratulations to all of our students who made the Dean's List! To make the list, a student must achieve a GPA of 3.5 or higher. Each recipient gets a signed letter from School of Pharmacy Dean, Bill Petros. Below is a complete list. (Click for more...) WVU School of Pharmacy seeks Director of Experiential Learning 1/23/2018 12:00:00 AM The WVU School of Pharmacy is seeking a Director of Experiential Learning at the rank of assistant professor to manage the APPE/IPPE programs and the Office of Experiential Learning. Apply online at https://goo.gl/18PTuk. (Click for more...) NIH funds WVU research to make diabetes and hypertension management a community activity 1/8/2018 12:00:00 AM Managing diabetes and high blood pressure can feel like a solitary enterprise dependent on relationships with objects (like pills or foods) and activities (like brisk walks or early bedtimes) instead of relationships with people, but a group of West Virginia University researchers is hoping to change that. (Click for more...) Mindful Morsels: Mindful Eating- January 16, 2017, 11:00 am, John Jones C 1/5/2018 12:00:00 AM Mindful Morsels is back for 2018. Mindful Eating will be held January 16, 2017, at 11:00 am in John Jones C. (Click for more...) Cancer Institute to sponsor talk on LGBTQI patient care 1/2/2018 12:00:00 AM WVU Cancer Institute will sponsor a talk on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex (LGBTQI) patient care on January 9, 2018, from 12 to 1 p.m., in the Fukushima Auditorium. Mandi Pratt-Chapman, MA, associate center director, patient-centered initiatives and health equity for the George Washington Cancer Center, will present What You Should (and Want) to Know About Your LGBTQI Patients. Chapman's personal mission is to make evidence-based cancer control strategies available to more people as quickly as possible. (Click for more...) Pharmacy residency program ASHP accredited 1/1/2018 12:00:00 AM WVU Medicine Jefferson Medical Center's pharmacy residency program has been approved for accreditation by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP). (Click for more...) Maynor named director of student affairs and academic initiatives 12/14/2017 12:00:00 AM Lena Maynor, PharmD, has been appointed director of student affairs and academic initiatives for the Health Sciences Center at West Virginia University. (Click for more...) Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy alumni are WVU 2017 Homecoming Award recipients 10/4/2017 12:00:00 AM Three School of Medicine alumni and a School of Pharmacy graduate are being recognized by the WVU Alumni Association as 2017 Homecoming Award recipients. (Click for more...) Discussion leaders named for Post-Charlottesville Town Hall 9/19/2017 12:00:00 AM Seven volunteer discussion leaders will take part in the Health Sciences-WVU Medicine Town Hall this Wednesday (Sept. 20) at noon in the Patteson Auditorium at WVU. (Click for more...) WVU, WV attorney general expand eighth grade drug prevention program 9/12/2017 12:00:00 AM West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey and West Virginia University have partnered to expand a program aimed at sharing drug abuse prevention information with eighth grade students in West Virginia. The initiative, launched in March with the West Virginia University School of Nursing, now also involves West Virginia University's School of Pharmacy and two other universities. (Click for more...) Student and faculty international travel grants available 9/1/2017 12:00:00 AM In honor of the legacy of a long-time staff member in WVU's Global Health Program, the Global Engagement Office (GEO) at Health Sciences is pleased to announce that the application period for the Nancy Sanders Memorial Student Travel Grant and the Nancy Sanders Memorial Faculty Research Abroad Grant is now open. (Click for more...) WVU health care simulation week kicks off Sept. 12 8/30/2017 12:00:00 AM September 12 kicks off national Health Care Simulation Week, and the WV STEPS Center welcomes visitors to a series of events highlighting simulation education. (Click for more...) WVU in the News - Study aims to increase effectiveness of opioid addiction treatment 8/15/2017 12:00:00 AM A new study being conducted at WVU is aimed at increasing the effectiveness of addiction treatment. As many as 20 percent of people addicted to opioids will not respond to the standard treatment of suboxone. Genetic background is one of several factors WVU and the West Virginia Clinical and Translation Science Institute will study to provide better more patient-specific addiction treatment. Get the full story on WV Always. (Click for more...) West Virginia health research gets $55 million boost 8/1/2017 12:00:00 AM MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Recommitting themselves to bring the benefits of research out of labs and hospitals and into the lives of West Virginia people and communities, a coalition of federal agencies, universities, hospitals and clinics will develop dozens of efforts over the next five years to battle addiction and cancer and reduce the impact of cardiovascular and neurological diseases. (Click for more...) Academy of Excellence in Teaching and Learning applications being accepted 7/20/2017 12:00:00 AM The WVU Health Sciences Faculty Development Program is now accepting applications, CVs and biographies for the 2017 Academy of Excellence in Teaching and Learning. (Click for more...) WVCTSI and WVU research aims to increase addiction treatment effectiveness 7/13/2017 12:00:00 AM MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Up to 20 percent of people with opioid use disorder may not respond to standard treatment. A new study at West Virginia University seeks to understand why. (Click for more...) Madhavan named to Fulbright Specialist Roster 7/10/2017 12:00:00 AM The U.S. State Department has added S. Suresh Madhavan, Ph.D., of the WVU School of Pharmacy to Fulbright Specialist Roster for the next three years. (Click for more...) Leukemia Research Foundation supports cancer research at WVU 7/5/2017 12:00:00 AM The Leukemia Research Foundation has awarded $100,000 to Wei Du, M.D., Ph.D., of the West Virginia University Cancer Institute to investigate a method for increasing the effectiveness of stem cell transplantation. (Click for more...) Town Hall to focus on heart care and research Thursday, June 15 6/6/2017 12:00:00 AM Two WVU Medicine heart specialists will be the special guests at an open forum for Health Sciences and WVU Medicine faculty, staff, and students at noon on Thursday, June 15, in the Okey Patteson Auditorium in the Health Sciences Center. (Click for more...) Meet the Graduates: Lindsey Glotfelty 5/16/2017 12:00:00 AM When asked what she wanted people to know about her, Lindsey Glotfelty of Finzel, Maryland, stated it's not really what she wants people to know about her, but rather the messages she wants them to get. She has four lessons that she has learned in her life, and they are the principles by which she lives. (Click for more...) ASK WVU MEDICINE: Breast to Brain Cancer - Risks and Research 5/15/2017 12:00:00 AM Join Hannah Hazard-Jenkins, M.D. and Paul Lockman, Ph.D., doctors who are dedicating their efforts to research and treatment of breast cancer, at the next Ask WVU Medicine Community Conversation, Tuesday, May 23 at 6 p.m. in the WVU Health Sciences Center Fukushima Auditorium. (Click for more...) WVU School of Pharmacy's Suresh Madhavan recipient of Distinguished Pharmacy Alumni Award from Purdue University 5/9/2017 12:00:00 AM S. Suresh Madhavan, MBA, Ph.D., was the recipient of Purdue University College of Pharmacy's 2017 Distinguished Pharmacy Alumni Award. Dr. Madhavan was one of four Purdue alumni who received this award, which recognizes the recipient's outstanding achievements in professional and scientific endeavors. (Click for more...) Cancer researcher is first alum to lead WVU School of Pharmacy 4/26/2017 12:00:00 AM William (Bill) Petros, PharmD, FCCP, has been appointed to the position. (Click for more...) WVU recognizes Health Sciences staff and faculty 4/10/2017 12:00:00 AM West Virginia University honored 13 individuals and two teams at the Health Sciences Center for outstanding achievement on Wednesday, April 12 at 4 p.m. in the Pylons Lobby. (Click for more...) Frank Alderman, MD, to speak at WVU College of Business and Economics Distinguished Speaker Series 4/3/2017 12:00:00 AM Frank Alderman, MD, CEO of MedExpress and a graduate of the WVU Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, will speak at the WVU College of Business and Economics's Distinguished Speaker Series on April 19 at 3:30 p.m. at the Morgantown Event Center. (Click for more...) WVU and WVCTSI fund two addiction projects 3/29/2017 12:00:00 AM MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The West Virginia University (WVU) Addiction Task Force and West Virginia Clinical and Translational Science Institute (WVCTSI) have funded two new research projects to combat the opioid epidemic in the state. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, West Virginia continues to be devastated by this epidemic, having the highest rate of drug overdose deaths in the nation. (Click for more...) Vera Bradley Bingo Relay for Life fundraiser 3/28/2017 12:00:00 AM The West Virginia University School of Pharmacy Relay for Life Team and the Lambda Kappa Sigma student organization will be hosting a Vera Bradley Bingo at 1 p.m. on Sunday, April 2, in room 1909 at the WVU Health Sciences Center in Morgantown. Doors open at noon. (Click for more...) WVU health professions students provide information on fall risk prevention 3/24/2017 12:00:00 AM Students from the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy and School of Medicine Division of Physical Therapy visited Sundale Rehabilitation – Long Term Care on March 22 to discuss fall risk prevention. (Click for more...) HSC Interprofessional Education Week celebration is March 27-31 3/6/2017 12:00:00 AM Join us for the inaugural HSC Interprofessional Education Week celebration (Click for more...) New pharmacy scholarship honors longtime West Virginia pharmacist 3/6/2017 12:00:00 AM The Jack H. Smith Family Pharmacy Scholarship was established not only to honor Suzanne Smith-Fox's father, but to assist a student who holds the same values as her father – generosity, community involvement, quality citizenship and an outstanding passion for receiving an education. Jack was a 1956 graduate from the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, and the endowed scholarship also honors Jack's father (Suzanne's grandfather) who was a pharmacist in Parkersburg, West Virginia. (Click for more...) WVU School of Pharmacy receives reaccreditation 2/9/2017 12:00:00 AM The West Virginia University School of Pharmacy's Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) professional program recently received continued accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). The accreditation is valid until 2025—a full eight years, which is the maximum length of time for ACPE's accreditation. (Click for more...)
 
Copyright© 2018 West Virginia Society of Health System Pharmacists. All rights reserved.

Updating...